Announcing the Restaurant and Food Beat

Andrew Parent  Photo Credit: Andrew Parent

Andrew Parent
Photo Credit: Andrew Parent

Paulina Jayne Isaac Photo Credit: Kate Patterson

Paulina Jayne Isaac
Photo Credit: Kate Patterson

Philadelphia, PA– Temple University students Paulina Jayne Isaac and Andrew Parent will cover restaurants and food during the 2014 fall semester.
While Philadelphia is known for its specialization in the culinary arts, we believe the city has more to offer than its better-known cheese steaks and hoagies.
Before taking on this project, Andrew and Paulina wondered if Philadelphia was just a “cheese steak-and-hoagie” metropolis. In Philadelphia, is the “Mom and Pop” store still a thriving component of city eating in an era of chain restaurants and food corporations?
What about its diversity and food culture? As Philadelphia can be accurately dubbed as something of an ethnic melting pot, which cultures have flourished in impacting Philadelphia’s eating habits? The city offers the Reading Terminal and Italian Markets, just blocks away from its renowned China Town. Nestled on the corner of 24th and Chestnut streets lies a Middle Eastern coffee and hookah bar. What other lesser-known and diverse establishments does the city offer?
This calls to question if the diverse restaurants in the city are intentionally catering to different niches and groups of customers, or are they competing with one another to win over these subgroups?
According to Visit Philadelphia, more than a decade of development has transformed the region’s dining scene into an abundant food and shopping destination. Understanding that the food and restaurant culture is at the heart of the city, it is likely that the city’s plentiful food options “downtown” is a large part of its relative economic success as opposed to other areas of the city. When did this transformation begin? Was there a major food hub in the city prior to its current downtown area?
This publication’s mission is to accurately report the city’s history, business and offerings in the art of producing and selling a wide variety of food.
Have tips or comments? Contact us at pjisaac@temple.edu and andrew.parent@temple.edu.

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